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Dave Muller— Summer Diary

Commissioned specifically for Moment to Moment, Dave Muller's series of large scale water color paintings are made from moments in his life that have defined "summer time."

As a DJ, curator and artist, Dave Muller examines with wit and irony the formation of an individual's identity through the amassing of cultural references.  He is known for his wall drawings and large-scale works on paper that employ iconic structures, such as top ten lists, to create diagrammatic yet uniquely personal portraits based on the musical passions of their subjects.

Starlee Kine— Suggestions for notes to leave behind in the place where you just house/pet/plant sat:

There is where your cat was indifferent to how much cable I was watching. This is where I questioned my taste in succulents.

Suggestions for notes to leave behind in the place where you just house/pet/plant sat:

This is the desk where early morning productivity was achieved.

This is the mirror where productivity dropped off in the afternoon and I stared at my face while assuring myself that no one looks good in sunglasses.

This is where I flipped through a fashion magazine and saw how everyone looks good in sunglasses. 

This is where I made myself feel better, judging you for having a fashion magazine subscription.

This is the counter with the single serve coffee machine where I most envied your life.

This is the dark, warm spot in the closet where I most envied your cat’s life.

This is the bowl that looks like it was your grandmother’s where I ate cashews and then rearranged the remaining cashews in to make it look like I hadn’t.

This is where I felt closest to you because I knew half the people in the photos on your fridge.

This is where I wondered why I wasn’t in a photo on your fridge.

There is where your cat was indifferent to how much cable I was watching.

This is where I questioned my taste in succulents. 

This is the dresser where I compared the cuteness of your baby pictures to mine.

This is the closet where I tried on three of your dresses.

This is the part of the living room where the light hit in a way that reminded me of my first apartment.

This is the rug which I laid on while looking up my college roommate.

This is the quilt in the trunk at the foot of your bed where I wondered whether I’d ever be able to have a family of my own, since I didn’t have the kind of childhood where handmade quilts got passed down.

This is where I caught the last five minutes of a movie my sister and I used to watch when we were kids and thought about calling to tell her I missed her but then a new movie started. 

This is where I spoke with a French accent to the delivery guy after not speaking all day.

This is where I traced guesses about your neighbor’s name on the shower tiles.

This is where I was tempted to read what appeared, judging by the hand-drawn hearts on the envelope and the wax seal, to be a love letter addressed to you, but resisted.

This is the old fashioned rotary dial phone on a hall table where a fight was picked with my boyfriend about why doesn’t he write me letters with seals and hearts.

This is where I stared into space after returning from the coffee place you recommended, where I ran into the last person I expected to see: the person I always want to see most. 


Starlee Kine is a contributor to the public radio program This American Life.  She does stories about the world's slowest car chase, misunderstood ghosts and presidential library reenactments.  She also wrote a torch song with the help of Phil Collins and designed a heartbreak cutting board designed specifally to cut tear-inducing onions on for THE THING Quarterly, to which she is a contributor at large.  

San Francisco

22 July 2013 - 18 August 2013

Market St + Castro Takeover: July 22nd to August 18th

The San Francisco Edition of Moment to Moment is the first in a series of public interventions that will take place over the summer and fall in SF, LA, Tokyo, London and NYC. The intervention is a magazine that uses existing advertising space in both the Castro Muni Station and around 16th and Market Streets, allowing the viewer/reader to walk through this magazine.

Specific to the SF Edition, we commissioned visual artist Leslie Shows to create a piece for a billboard at 16th and Market. Choosing to work with the history of the billboard itself, Shows has created a collage that incorporates details of past advertisements.

The Edition also includes the work of visual artists Susan O'Malley, Dave Muller, Harrell Fletcher and writer/radio personality Starlee Kine, who will have two large floor texts in the Castro Muni Station.

This edition will launch on July 22nd. We will provide documentation of this location in the coming days.

Good Things Take Time

Jonn Herschend— Rock

Jonn's film, entitled Rock, was commissioned by Levi's Made & Crafted and consists of a single take in which nothing happens and everything happens.  A woman (THE THING Quarterly's Managing Editor Sarah Simon) walks through a field and discovers a rock.  Herschend's work is focused on the moments where confusion, boredom and beauty exist.  He feels that it is in these moments that we can better understand who we are and what we are doing in this confusion that we live in. 

Jonn Herschend is a San Francisco-based artist and filmmaker.  He is co-editor and cofounder of THE THING Quarterly and a recent recpient of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's SECA award.  

Susan O'Malley— Mantras for the Urban Dweller

We've been long-time fans of Susan O'Malley's enthusiastic sign-based work that reads more like positive pep-talks. For Moment to Moment, we envisioned these pieces existing in an urban landscape as visual mantras for the urban dweller, something to pull us out of our daily routine and into something larger.  Susan states that the works are "off-kilter, open-ended public service announcements; invitations to pause among the noise, the grit, and the hustle of the city.  The texts open the possibility for a flash of introspection in the hamster-wheel of life; and the words can be repeated, changed, spoken, howled, whispered or interpreted.  In these works I'm suggesting my wish for how things could be: if we paid closer attention to our being, to our grieving, to the way the sun makes a spectacular reflection on the buildings at that certain time of the day.  It has to begin somewhere, why not here?  It's your choice."

Susan O'Malley makes art that connects us to each other.  She has given pep talks in parking lots, asked for advice from strangers, and installed inspirational posters in public – because, as she states,"we are all in this together."  She lives, works, walks, and talks to other people in Berkeley, California.  Susan is represented by Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco.

Starlee Kine— A suggestion:

Here’s a game you can play whenever you are putting off doing something tedious, like washing the dishes.

Here’s a game you can play whenever you are putting off doing something tedious, like washing the dishes.  It’s called “stage business.” The rules of the game are simple. You are an actor in a dramatic scene and need to busy yourself with an everyday task. So while it may look like you are just scrubbing a plate, really this is happening moments before the event that advances the rest of the plot forward. This plot is your life. Maybe the event will be a ringing phone, and you will reach for a paper towel to dry your hands, but the tube will be empty because you keep forgetting to buy more, and so you’ll have to use your pant leg. This will have the bonus of helping to establish your character. Or it might be that in a moment you will drop the plate, and when you go to pick up the pieces, you’ll notice a poem that’s been written in the crack between where the floorboards start and the kitchen counter stops. You’ll devote the next thirty years to finding out who put it there, not as a full-time job, but as an unpaid, casual side project. 


Starlee Kine is a contributor to the public radio program This American Life.  She does stories about the world's slowest car chase, misunderstood ghosts and presidential library reenactments.  She also wrote a torch song with the help of Phil Collins and designed a heartbreak cutting board designed specifally to cut tear-inducing onions on for THE THING Quarterly, to which she is a contributor at large.  

Leslie Shows— A Curving Trail

Specific to the San Francisco Edition of Moment to Moment, we commissioned visual artist Leslie Shows to create a piece for a billboard at 16th and Market. Choosing to address multiple viewer distances and the scale and function of the billboard itself, Shows has created a blown-up collage that broadcasts a set of material incidents.

Leslie Shows has exhibited at the 2011 Mercosul Biennial in Brazil, the 2006 California Biennial, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Solo exhibitions include the Jack Hanley Gallery in New York, Haines Gallery in San Francisco, and, in 2014, the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art.

Harrell Fletcher— Hello There Friend: Los Angeles

Starlee Kine— A selection of thoughts you probably had while staring at a stranger sitting across from you:

I make more money but she/he is better at only buying well-crafted items that are both practical and beautiful.

A selection of thoughts you probably had while staring at a stranger sitting across from you:

  • She/he is cuter.
  • I’m cuter but she/he dresses better.
  • I dress better but she/he has the kind of body that can get away with wearing worse clothes.
  • She/he has a more interesting job.
  • I have a more interesting job but she/he makes more money.
  • I make more money but she/he is better at only buying well-crafted items that are both practical and beautiful.
  • I’ve traveled to more countries but she/he has gone to ones that are harder to get to with more challenging language barriers.
  • I was more popular in high school.
  • I was less popular in high school but aged better.
  • I was less popular in high school and aged worse and every conviction I ever had about the world not being fair is right this moment being demonstrated in front of me.
  • I went to a worse school.
  • I went to a better school but she/he is more down to earth.
  • I have a plusher couch that guests like sleeping on but she/he has a more modern one that guests take photos of.
  • I have more friends who will listen to my problems but she/he has more friends without kids who will go with them to parties.
  • I call my parents more often but hers/his make her/him feel less lonely.
  • I’ve broken more hearts.
  • Her/his heart’s been broken less.
  • I’ve dated more people but she/he has had more friendships turn into relationships.
  • I’m so glad I’m not dating her/him.
  • I wish I was dating her/him.
  • My girlfriend/boyfriend is cuter.
  • My girlfriend/boyfriend is funnier.
  • My girlfriend/boyfriend is less funny, more ambitious, about the same amount of cute, and has a lower-maintenance family who take it less personally when space is needed during holiday visits.
  • Would she/he ever date me?
  • Was she/he watching me fix my sock just then?
  • If her/his boyfriend/girlfriend were to say, next week, “Think of one person, besides me, who you would want to be with forever,” will it be my face that flits, even for just a second, through her/his head?

Starlee Kine is a contributor to the public radio program This American Life.  She does stories about the world's slowest car chase, misunderstood ghosts and presidential library reenactments.  She also wrote a torch song with the help of Phil Collins and designed a heartbreak cutting board designed specifally to cut tear-inducing onions on for THE THING Quarterly, to which she is a contributor at large.   

amber beads  glass teapot